The Slow-Wave script excerpt

‘In thinking of the epistolary as a method of evaluating works built on personal narrative and intimate divulgence, it seems a that the lack of direct address, but a knowledge that there will be an address, is at the core of these works for the makers.

Rather than exploring directly the conceptual concerns presented by the artists, perhaps this method of mediated exposure allows them to evaluate themselves at a safe distance. What at first seems a hypothesis created to allow a space within which to operate, just as a correspondence develops as an intimate space for the sharing of ideas, or the trying-out of methods of being through different voices or performances – one that has its own set of dynamics, rules and devices – so these artists do in public through their work.

In this view, the artist is a series of characters, harnessed through various processes of production, and ‘confessional’, contrary to the typical understanding of the word, is used here as a method of not sharing, rather a route to become ‘other’ for the maker and, vicariously, the audience.’

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My original article, ‘Aspects of the Confessional’ (2013), was written in consideration of Dr. Liz Stanley’s article The Epistolarium: On Theorizing Letters and Correspondences, (Auto/Biography, 2004), to explore the process of letter-writing and correspondence as a route to explore and re-frame processes of confession in Helen Chadwick’s Piss Flowers (1992), in Sophie Calle’s ‘Take Care of Yourself’ (2007), and in my own installation work, ‘Stepping Out’ (2009).